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Quantum 2020 Accurist Baitcasting Reels

Quantum 2020 Accurist Baitcasting Reels

$109.99

Daiwa Lexa TW Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Lexa TW Baitcasting Reels

$349.99

Shimano Curado 300 K Low Profile Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Curado 300 K Low Profile Baitcasting Reels

$209.99

Shimano Curado BFS Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Curado BFS Baitcasting Reels

$199.99

Daiwa 2021 Prorex TWS Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa 2021 Prorex TWS Baitcasting Reels

$319.99

Shimano SLX DC Baitcasting Reels

Shimano SLX DC Baitcasting Reels

$189.99

Daiwa Tatula SV TW103 Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Tatula SV TW103 Baitcasting Reels

$199.99

Daiwa 2020 Lexa WN Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa 2020 Lexa WN Baitcasting Reels

$199.99

Shimano Curado MGL 70 K Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Curado MGL 70 K Baitcasting Reels

$239.99

Daiwa 2021 Zillion SV TW Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa 2021 Zillion SV TW Baitcasting Reels

$349.99

Shimano Curado MGL 150 Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Curado MGL 150 Baitcasting Reels

$199.99

Shimano Tranx 150 Low Profile Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Tranx 150 Low Profile Baitcasting Reels

$209.99

Daiwa Tatula Elite Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Tatula Elite Baitcasting Reels

$229.99

Daiwa Coastal SV TW 150 Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Coastal SV TW 150 Baitcasting Reels

$249.99

Daiwa Lexa HD Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Lexa HD Baitcasting Reels

$249.99

Daiwa Deps Dr Z Limited Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Deps Dr Z Limited Baitcasting Reels

$499.99

Shimano 2020 Metanium MGL Baitcasting Reels

Shimano 2020 Metanium MGL Baitcasting Reels

$439.99

Shimano Calcutta Conquest 100-200 Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Calcutta Conquest 100-200 Baitcasting Reels

$579.99

Daiwa Tatula TW300 Baitcasting Reels

Daiwa Tatula TW300 Baitcasting Reels

$269.99

Shimano SLX MGL 70 Baitcasting Reels

Shimano SLX MGL 70 Baitcasting Reels

$149.99

Shimano Calcutta D Baitcasting Reels

Shimano Calcutta D Baitcasting Reels

$349.99

Displaying 48 products

Baitcasting Reels

At J&H, we guarantee there’s a baitcasting reel for you to enjoy. We stock some of the top manufacturers in the business, including Shimano, Daiwa, Penn, Quantum and more. Browse through our selection to find the perfect reel for your rod and upgrade your saltwater fishing experience.

What is the difference between a baitcasting reel and spinning reels?

Baitcasting reels are a completely different shape from spinning reels. They are generally compact in design and meant to fit in the palm of your hand ergonomically for maximum comfort. The line on a baitcasting reel will come off the top of spool and flow through the guides on top of the rod. With spinning reels, the line flows off the side of the spool and through the guides which sit underneath the blank of the rod. While both baitcasting and spinning and pretty straightforward, spinning is considered an easier type of reel to use as it eliminates the chance of birdnesting the line. When casting, a baitcasting reel is more suitable for an experienced anglers because you need to thumb the spool a bit but it quickly becomes part of your muscle memory after a little practice.

J&H Tackle Baitcasting Reels 3

Should you buy baitcasting reels if you’re a beginner?

Yes and no. If you are really hesitant and concerned about backlashes, then go with the spinning reel. If you have some confiedence then fishing a baitcaster is easy to learn and a skill you will pick up quickly. Baitcasting reels are not complex to use. They just take a little more practice to master than a spinning reel does.

How do you know when you are ready to move on from a spinning reel to a baitcaster?

This is going to be personal preference. When you get more into the sport of fishing and you want to try something a bit more advanced, then start fishing a baitcaster. Some people go their entire life just fishing spinning and others just fish baitcasters. Nothing is set in stone. Just fish with what you are comfortable with.

How much does a baitcasting reel cost?

Take a look at our selection of reels above and you will see there is a wide range of prices for baitcasting reels. A good saltwater baitcasting reel is going to start at around $100.  On the other end of the scale, the more expensive offerings can exceed $600. While freshwater baitcasters can get up to that price you are paying for finesse. On a saltwater baitcaster you are paying more for stronger internals to handle bigger fish.

Why are these reels so expensive?

If you have been shopping for fishing reels before, you may notice that baitcasters are more expensive than some of the other options out there. Again, to compare them to spinning reels, you will find some far more budget-friendly options in that category.

So, why are they so expensive?

Ultimately, baitcasting reel princes are representative of the quality needed in your reel. When saltwater fishing, you have to appreciate that the fish are bigger and heavier here. Therefore, you need a more robust reel with stronger internals. Stainless steel gears would be an example of something you would find in a higher priced saltwater baitcasting rel. If you are targeting big fish and your reel can’t handle it, it won’t be a fun day on the water.

What factors affect the price of a baitcasting reel?

A wide range of factors can influence the price of your new reel. Primarily, the material the reel is made of will be one of the key elements that set the price high or low. Normally, you will find the reels made from one of two materials:

●      Aluminum

●      Graphite

Graphite is considered a more budget-friendly option because it is lighter and more affordable. However, it is nowhere near as robust as aluminum, so the reel is unlikely to take as much punishment as an aluminum reel will.

The more premium reels that feature aluminum construction are still lightweight, but they are more durable. Graphite is more likely to flex while aluminum will not. If you’re serious about fishing, this is well worth considering as it could save money in the long run. Buying a cheaper baitcaster reel might seem like a good idea, but it will need to be replaced more frequently. Over time, it would be wiser to invest in a premium product.

Of course, the brand will also affect the price. Alongside this, baitcasting reels can be more expensive or cheaper depending on the gears inside the reel and the type of handle it has. Most baitcasting reels will have two paddle handles or a single power arm.

J&H Tackle Baitcasting Reels 1

Is it worth buying a cheap baitcaster reel?

It can be, but it depends on how often you fish. If fishing is a side hobby that you do occasionally, then it can be better to opt for a cheaper reel. You’re not going to use it much, so it should last for longer. The chances are you won’t fish frequently enough to see the benefits of a stronger and more expensive reel.

However, as touched upon already, if you’re an avid saltwater fisher that will use this reel a lot, it pays to get a more expensive one.

What are the key things to look for when buying a baitcasting reel?

Generally, most fishing experts will agree there are eight key things to look for when buying baitcasting reels. These are:

●      Gear Ratio

●      Drag

●      Inches Per Turn

●      Braking

●      Style

●      Bearings

●      Handedness

●      Budget

Gear Ratio

Every fishing reel will have a gear ratio. Simply put, gear ratios show you how many times the reel spool will turn whenever you turn the reel handle. You will see it expressed as this when buying your reels:

●      Rotation (Spool): Rotation (Handle)

Here are two examples of gear ratios from our collection:

The Shimano Corvalus Round Baitcasting Reel is one of our cheaper options with a 5.2:1 gear ratio. If you rotate the handle once, the spool will rotate 5.2 times.

By contrast, one of the higher-end baitcasting reels - the Shimano Calcutta Conquest - has a 7.4:1 ratio. So, when you rotate the handle on this reel once, you get an extra 2.2 rotations compared to the previous model.

Why does this matter to you? It all comes down to the lures you’re using. If you are using lures that need you to act fast when there’s a bite, then you require a reel with a high gear ratio. For those of you that typically use lures such as crankbaits or spinnerbaits, a lower gear ratio is preferred.

Drag

This is incredibly important as every baitcasting reel will come with a maximum drag reading. This refers to the maximum amount of force that can be exerted on the reel before it breaks. Essentially, it is important to get a baitcaster reel with a high drag if you intend on fishing for heavy fish.

The more drag you can exert on the reel, the safer it will be to use when fishing for something heavy. Keep this in mind or you run the risk of snapping the line and you’re damaging your reel.

Inches Per Turn

IPT is something you should consider alongside the gear ratio. Basically, it refers to how long a line spooled will be during one handle rotation. It can be useful in determining how much line will wrap around the spool during a rotation. If two rods have the same gear ratio, one could have more inches per turn.

You can find the IPT of a rod on product descriptions, but some manufacturers don’t always include them. As such, most fishermen agree that IPT is secondary to gear ratio. It’s not something you need to worry about if you can’t find the information.

Braking

Some of the older baitcasters don’t have a brake feature at all. Already, this is a key factor in determining if a reel is worth buying or not. We recommend purchasing a model with a braking feature as it makes your life easier.

Fundamentally, a brake will allow you to stop the line if it rotates too quickly on the spool. When this happens, you end up with a mess of line that’s impossible to untangle and ruins your fishing trip. While you can use your thumb as a brake, getting a reel with a setting will be more practical.

So, be sure to check if the reel has a braking system built-in, then choose whichever one you get on with the best. For beginners, a centrifugal braking system is usually the best as it is designed to prevent you from overcasting your line right away.

Style

The style of a baitcaster can be extremely important if you are targeting specific fish. Some fish respond better to a rounded baitcaster, while others respond better to different styles. The benefit of a round baitcaster reel is that it will have a slightly raised profile. Therefore, it can hold more line, meaning you have more wiggle room when a fish bites and tries to flee. It’s perfect if you are opting for larger species.

Handedness

Are you right or left-handed? Or, more specifically, which hand do you reel with? If you’ve been fishing before, you should already know this. The easiest way to conclude is to think about what hand you use with a spinning reel. In most cases, you will benefit from using the same hand when you graduate from a baitcaster.

Therefore, you have to ensure you buy a reel that’s designed for your specific type of handedness. If you’re right-handed but use a left-handed reel, it can feel strange and be difficult for you to operate.

Bearings

All baitcaster reels will include ball bearings on the inside. What’s the purpose of these bearings? In simple terms, they allow for all the moving parts to rotate and move around freely. Without them, everything would get stuck, and you’d end up with problems.

Contrary to popular belief, more isn’t necessarily better here. You might think that having lots of ball bearings is preferential, but that isn’t always the case. Instead, it’s more about quality over quantity. Always be sure to look for bearings that are of the highest quality out there.

How do you know which bearings are better than others? As a rule, shielded or sealed bearings tend to be recommended by experts.

Budget

Arguably, this is the most important factor to consider when buying your baitcaster reels. How much money can you afford to spend? It’s a smart idea to figure out your budget before you do anything else. From here, you can look at the reels within your price range and consider all of the other elements spoken about previously.

As a result, you can find the best baitcasting reel for your budget!

J&H Tackle Baitcasting Reels 2

What brands of baitcasting reels are available at J&H?

We always strive to deliver the best products for all of our customers. Therefore, we’re keen to stock baitcasting reels from some of the top brands in the angling industry. Here are all of the brands we sell:

●      Quantum

●      Daiwa

●      Shimano

●      Penn

Our company prides itself on quality, not quantity. We could stock other brands, but we are committed to only delivering the highest quality available. Thus, these are the three brands that currently sell the best baitcasting reels in the world. In the future, we may consider adding more brands to this list - as we have already done with our other reels and products. However, for now, we’re sticking to the top three.

How do you use a baitcaster reel?

There are three main steps involved when using a baitcaster for the first time: 

●      Spool your baitcaster

●      Adjust the reel

●      Cast off

Spooling your reel starts by choosing the right type of line to use. You can pick between monofilament, fluorocarbon, or braided. Most anglers say that braided is the best for baitcasting, so keep that in mind.

Then, thread the line through the guides on your rod and through the reel. Get your line wrapped around the spool and tie it in a knot. Fasten the spool towards the tip of the rod so you have a nice flow off the spool.

After this, you can adjust the reel by playing with the different settings. This means you can alter the tension, use the brake system, and alter the drag. Obviously, you will do this depending on the type of fish you are searching for. If you are in an area with big fish, you’ll need to adjust the settings to accommodate the extra weight.

Finally, you can cast your baitcasting reel. Start by pushing your thumb down on the line with the rod out in front of you. Always keep the pressure as you lift the rod up and over your shoulder. Flick your wrist ahead, letting go of your thumb to allow the line to cast out. You can use your brake system to stop the line as the lure begins to slow down or press back down on it with your thumb. Reel the handle slightly forward and this will lock in the spool.

It is paramount that you practice all of these steps as much as possible. Unlike a spinning reel, a baitcaster reel is much harder to get the hang of. Practice makes perfect, so expect to fail or struggle the first few times you attempt this. Keep going out there and trying again and again until you feel confident.

What type of rod do you need for a baitcasting reel?

Naturally, a baitcaster will require a different rod than a spinning reel. So, there is a chance you will need to purchase an upgrade. Why? Well, it all comes down to weight and durability once again. Bigger and heavier fish can break and snap a weaker and more lightweight rod. As such, you need something that can withstand the extra pressure and force.

A casting rod is recommended when using a baitcasting reel. There are so many different models to choose from but they generally feature a reel seat with a trigger and range from 6’-8’ in length.  

Can I get free shipping on my new reel?

Yes, you absolutely can! Here at J&H Tackle, we are always looking for ways to reward our loyal customers. If you spend $100 or more on our website, your order will qualify for FREE Standard Shipping. The good news is, even the cheapest baitcasting reels are close to this cut-off point! So, you can get free shipping by adding something extra to your order if you like. 

If you have any further questions relating to your baitcaster after buying it, please don’t hesitate to get in touch. We also have a lot of excellent free content on our YouTube channel, which you can view here.